{The Basics} Perfect Brown Rice

{The Basics} Perfect Brown Rice

a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-rJj7UoqHyEQ/Tw8c6IL4-3I/AAAAAAAAm8M/x1DDrXgGuUo/s1600/Rice-1-text.jpg" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 0em; margin-right: 1em;"img border="0" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-rJj7UoqHyEQ/Tw8c6IL4-3I/AAAAAAAAm8M/x1DDrXgGuUo/s1600/Rice-1-text.jpg" //aIf given a choice between eating white or brown rice, I'd choose brown rice any day.  Not only because it's healthier than choosing white rice, but also because I happen to prefer the way it tastes - I love the nutty flavor and chewy texture of brown rice.  With brown rice the bran layer has been left intact, which makes it high in fiber and essential minerals.  While white rice is more convenient because it cooks faster and is more commonly prefered because it's fluffier in texture, it's not as nutritious and needs to be fortified in order for some of the lost nutrients to be added back in.  Personally, I prefer to stick with the all-natural choice.br /The only problem is - ibrown rice is a pain to cook/i.  If there's one thing in the kitchen that gives me the biggest challenge it's producing perfectly cooked {inot sticky, soggy or mushy/i} brown rice.  I typically follow the package instructions - iwhich I've learned is not the best idea!/i - and no matter how precise I am in my measurements, it just never turns out well.  br /div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Mi7Va2ZGqJw/Tw8cu5UmBYI/AAAAAAAAm8E/tC2o2jx3Sv8/s1600/rice-2.jpg" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 0em; margin-right: 1em;"img border="0" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Mi7Va2ZGqJw/Tw8cu5UmBYI/AAAAAAAAm8E/tC2o2jx3Sv8/s1600/rice-2.jpg" //a/divI've found the only place I can enjoy perfectly cooked brown rice is when I order it from an Asian restaurant.  I believe most use a a href="http://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/panasonic-5-cup-electric-rice-cooker/" target="blank"brice cooker/steamer/b/a to achieve their perfect results.  I've considered buying one, but decided it was just another small kitchen appliance that would take up precious cabinet or counter space - not to mention, most decent quality models are very pricey.br /div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-h-NI524kvIA/Tw8cnrb7JbI/AAAAAAAAm78/8PhFtFrTfEI/s1600/rice-3.jpg" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 0em; margin-right: 1em;"img border="0" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-h-NI524kvIA/Tw8cnrb7JbI/AAAAAAAAm78/8PhFtFrTfEI/s1600/rice-3.jpg" //a/divSo - for me this method from a href="http://www.saveur.com/" target="blank"bSaveur magazine/b/a has been such a great discovery!  I was apprehensive it would work as it claimed, but the results have been spot on and fool-proof after many attempts cooking rice this way.  It really couldn't be simpler and the best part about it is the rice cooks quicker using this method than using the standard water absorpbtion method.  Who has an hour on a weeknight to cook brown rice?  Most nights, I certainly don't - which is why I don't serve it as much as I would like to.br /a href="http://s1003.photobucket.com/albums/af151/theparsleythief/?action=view¤t=brown-rice.gif" target="blank"img alt="Photobucket" border="0" src="http://i1003.photobucket.com/albums/af151/theparsleythief/brown-rice.gif" //abr /div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-HvcnwaMvI0E/Tw8cQmgXI5I/AAAAAAAAm70/0SuO3hZXivI/s1600/rice-4.jpg" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 0em; margin-right: 1em;"img border="0" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-HvcnwaMvI0E/Tw8cQmgXI5I/AAAAAAAAm70/0SuO3hZXivI/s1600/rice-4.jpg" //a/divWith this method all that is required is some measuring of the two ingredients {dry brown rice and water}, rinsing the rice, followed by 30 minutes of simmering, a quick drain in a colander and then a 10 minute steam {to absorb the last bits of water}.  It is recommended you use a pot with a heavy, tight-fitting lid - something like a a href="http://cookware.lecreuset.com/cookware/TopCategoriesDisplay?storeId=10151&catalogId=20002&langId=-1" target="blank"bDutch oven/b/a would be prefect.  But I realize not everyone owns one of these pots, so I also tried this method using a standard stockpot.  To prevent any steam from escaping through the lid I covered the top of the pot tightly with foil before placing the lid on top - this worked perfectly as well.br /div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-vQzJfEOVKxs/Tw8cD2X3M0I/AAAAAAAAm7s/-4l24tV8qbs/s1600/rice-5.jpg" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 0em; margin-right: 1em;"img border="0" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-vQzJfEOVKxs/Tw8cD2X3M0I/AAAAAAAAm7s/-4l24tV8qbs/s1600/rice-5.jpg" //a/divI believe this method will work for white rice as well - although the cooking time would be less, of course.  However, I have not tried it - so I can't vouch for the results {iIf anyone does, please let me know in the comment section/i}.  Now that I've learned this method I can't say I'll be eating much white rice from now on.br /biHave any of you tried this method before and had as much success as I did?  What's your favorite way to cook brown rice?/i/bbr /Next up - some recipes to use your perfectly cooked brown rice with!br /a href="http://www.theparsleythief.com/2012/01/basics-perfect-brown-rice.html#more"Wait, there's more! Click here to keep reading.../a

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