Easy Singapore Noodles (星洲炒米粉)

Easy Singapore Noodles (星洲炒米粉)

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Singapore noodles is one of the most popular takeout dishes. The thin rice noodles are tossed in a curry sauce with shrimp, Chinese BBQ pork, onions, and peppers. It’s so scrumptious and bursting with flavor. {Vegetarian adaptable, Gluten-free adaptable}

It is a matter of debate where this dish really originated. Some sources says it’s from Hong Kong, while others say Malaysia. It’s definitely not from Singapore, I’ve been told. Back in China, this is a must-have dish on the menus of all the Cantonese restaurants. So for me, this is a classic Cantonese dish we usually order alongside dim sum.

Living in the US, I sometimes crave a nice big plate of fried noodles. When I happen to have homemade char siu BBQ pork on hand, it’s rather convenient. However, more often than not, I want to use whatever I have in the fridge to fix dinner instead of running to an Asian market to buy char siu.

That’s why I created this recipe. I want to show you how easy it is to create authentic tasting Singapore noodles that are as good as the Chinese restaurant version using ingredients that are easy to find.

Cooking notes 1. Use the correct rice noodles Singapore noodles always use the super thin type of rice noodles, or vermicelli. I use Wei Chuan brand when I can find it, but many other brands work too. You can find the noodles in an Asian market, as well as on Amazon.

To use the rice noodles, you need to pre-soak them until tender. Follow the instructions on the package. If the package does not include instructions, soak the noodles for 10 to 15 minutes, and check their texture during the process. You want the noodles al-dente before cooking, so they will be cooked perfectly after the stir fry.

2. Flexible protein ingredients Singapore noodles usually use shrimp, char siu pork, and eggs as key ingredients. In this recipe, I used some ground turkey to replace the char siu pork and the dish turned out beautifully. Of course you can use any ground meat you prefer. You can also use any combination of proteins and still make this dish work. For example, swap the shrimp with more ground meat, skip the eggs, etc.

3. How to make this dish vegetarian or vegan You can make this dish vegetarian by using a block of tofu to replace the protein (shrimp, ground meat, and eggs). Cut the tofu into small cubes and fry them until golden. Then you can toss them with the noodles. The dish will turn out just as delicious.

4. How to make this dish gluten-free Simply use dry sherry to replace the Shaoxing wine. And use tamari or coconut aminos to replace the soy sauce.

Final thought A plate of beautiful Singapore noodles might look super challenging to make at first. But once you try it, you’ll be surprised how easy it is. You don’t need a wok or a gas stove. Yep, I have an electric stove at home and I use a nonstick skillet. But as long as you follow a solid recipe and use the right ingredients, you’ll recreate the Chinese restaurant experience right in your own kitchen.

Happy cooking and I hope you enjoy the dish!

More Asian Takeout Recipes Cashew Chicken (腰果鸡丁)

Mongolian Beef (Without Using a Wok)

Chicken Lo Mein (Restaurant Style Without A Wok)

Wonton Soup

Chinese BBQ Char Siu (叉烧肉)

If you give this recipe a try, let us know! Leave a comment, rate it (once you’ve tried it), and take a picture and tag it @omnivorescookbook on Instagram! I’d love to see what you come up with.

5 from 1 vote

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Easy Singapore Noodles (星洲炒米粉)

Prep Time

20 mins

Cook Time

10 mins

Total Time

30 mins

Singapore noodles is one of the most popular takeout dishes. The thin rice noodles are tossed in a curry sauce with shrimp, Chinese BBQ pork, onions, and peppers. It’s so scrumptious and bursting with flavor. {Vegetarian adaptable, Gluten-free adaptable}

Course: Main

Cuisine: Chinese

Keyword: takeout

Servings: 2

Calories: 739 kcal

Ingredients

  • 4 oz (110 g) dried rice noodles
  • 2 tablespoons Shaoxing wine (or dry sherry)
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon curry powder (use 2 teaspoons for a less spicier dish)
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar
  • 1/8 teaspoon white pepper
  • 2 tablespoons peanut oil (or vegetable oil)
  • 1/2 lb (225 g) shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • 1/2 lb (225 g) ground meat (or sliced char siu, or sliced ham)
  • 2 teaspoons minced ginger
Read the whole recipe on Omnivore's Cookbook