Rock Cakes

Rock Cakes

I ate a rock cake.

And DAMN, was it good.

Ingredients

  • And DAMN, was it good.
  • No, I was on my way to the cattle mart, and it was literally lashing sheets of rain, sideways drops coming down so hard and fast that I had no option but to pull over in Listowel town. I was sitting idly awaiting a break in the rain, leafing through a beat up issue of Bon Appétit that I had found under my seat when I noticed a charming little café through the passenger window. Since there was no sign of cow evidence on my clothing and my wellies were next to new, I foraged for my brolly in the back and made a run for it.
  • When I walked through the door, I was struck by the warmth, of not only the bustle of interesting, clever looking patrons, but of the scent of an old wood-burning stove in the corner and steamed up windows with cushioned seats at the front. I glanced at my watch, looked back outside at the heavy rain and decided there would be no harm in staying for a spell. I found a seat at the only available table edged into a corner next to the counter and requested a coffee.
  • I sat sipping on a scalding hot cappuccino, peeking at literature for the writers’ festival left behind on the table while observing a group of gentlemen in tattered Irish tweed coats in lively conversation with one another in front of me. As they drifted out of the room, I noticed an array of baked goods on top of the beautifully appointed vintage bakery case. A basket of scone-like pastries with a sign identifying them as “Rock Cakes.” stood out to me as peculiar. Curious, I walked over and asked the barista what they were. She dutifully explained that rock cakes were essentially a combination of scone and cake with currants inside. “Would you like to order one?” she gently asked, “Oh, how could I resist?” I cheekily answered. She placed a rock cake on a dainty plate and handed it to me. I sat back down, took a nibble, and was absolutely bowled over by the tenderness and sweet flavour of something called a rock cake.
  • Before I knew it, I was finger-dabbing rock cake crumbs from the plate as the rain cleared, and it was once again time to carry on with farm business. I grabbed the Writers Week brochures and my umbrella, and bid adieu to the little café on the corner, promising to come again.
  • Apparently, rock cakes became popular in the UK and Ireland during the Second World War, when eggs and sugar were at a premium. They are called Rock Cakes or Rock Buns not because they are hard, but because the rough tops resemble rocky outcroppings . If made with the best possible ingredients, these cakes can rival both scones and cakes. Substitute chocolate chips for the little ones (or little ones at heart) and they are really quite a treat. Nowadays, like to pack “choccy rock cakes” for a country picnic, but they will always remind me of that rainy Writers’ Week day.
  • Rock Cakes
  • Makes 6
  • ¼ cup/25g all purpose flour
  • 1/3 cup/75g caster (superfine) sugar, plus extra for finishing
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 8.5 tbsp/125g unsalted butter, cut into cubes
  • 1 egg
  • About 2 tbsp/30ml milk
  • A good pinch of salt
  • Plus, optional, any or all of:
1 ¼ cups chocolate chips, dried currants or sultanas,
1-2 tsp mixed spice or vanilla extract, the finely grated zest of 1 orange or 1 lemon
  • Line baking trays lined with nonstick paper, and heat the oven to 200C (180C fan-assisted)/400F
  • Sift the flour, sugar and baking powder into a large mixing bowl, add the cubed butter and rub it through evenly.
  • Add chocolate chips, dried fruit and/or spices.
  • Beat the egg with the milk in another bowl, along with any flavourings such as extracts or essences that tickle your fancy.
  • Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and mix to a stiff, but spoonable dough – add a dash more milk, if you think it needs it.
  • Scoop egg-sized dollops of the dough on to the tray in rows of two, keeping them rough looking.
  • Sprinkle with sugar.
  • Bake for 15-20 minutes, until just turning golden-brown.
  • Cool and serve.
  • Scullery Notes: If prepared with currants or dried fruit, serve with clotted cream and jam.
  • You may have noticed that I have added an Upcoming Events page to the blog, some fun stuff on the calendar! I have two tickets to give away to the Irish Country Magazine Reader Evening on May 27th, leave a comment below to be in the draw, it would be great to see you!
  • Also, I’ve added a little page about The Farm for those interested in how we are set up here.
  • Slan Abhaile,
  • Imen
Read the whole recipe on I Married an Irish Farmer